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Author Topic:   Monarch butterflies?
Dulce Luna
Knowflake

Posts: 4421
From: The Asylum
Registered: Mar 2006

posted October 05, 2007 01:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dulce Luna     Edit/Delete Message
Errr, I haven't seen monarch butterflies in years and now all of the sudden in the past three weeks I've spotted one on my way to school, on my way home, on my way to work, etc, etc. I don't know if I'm sounding superstitious or anything...its just that I find it strange to be spotting them all of the sudden after all these years of never seeing them.

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yourfriendinspirit
Knowflake

Posts: 767
From: California, USA
Registered: Oct 2006

posted October 05, 2007 02:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for yourfriendinspirit     Edit/Delete Message
Where do you live?
Is it possible someone/project is helping breed these? Is there more that the normal amount of milkweed in your area this year?

I used to live very near a place that did just that called Natural Bridges State Park

The park's Monarch Grove provides a temporary home for over 100,000 Monarchs each winter. From mid-October through the end of February, the Monarchs form a "city in the trees." The areas mild ocean air and eucalyptus grove provide a safe roost until spring. In the spring and summer, the butterflies live in the valley regions west of the Rocky Mountains where milkweed, the only plant a Monarch caterpillar eats, is plentiful.

The Monarch Grove has been declared a Natural Preserve, thus protecting the Monarchs and their winter habitat from human encroachment or harm. This is the only State Monarch Preserve in California.

Monarchs begin arriving in October and most are gone by the first week of March. The grove contains eucalyptus trees which are located in a canyon, providing the Monarch needed shelter from the wind. These winter flowering trees are also a convenient food source for the butterfly. On chilly days when the temperature drops below 60 degrees, the butterflies cluster together in the eucalyptus trees for warmth.



The park maintains a demonstration milkweed patch where visitors may view Monarch eggs, caterpillars and chrysalides. For about half a year, milkweed is the Monarch's home, super market and maternity ward. The Monarch larva eats only the milkweed plant.


------------------
Sendin' love your way,
"your friend in spirit"

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Mannu
Knowflake

Posts: 1093
From:
Registered: Mar 2006

posted October 05, 2007 02:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mannu     Edit/Delete Message
they are so pretty. thanks yfis (abbr)

butterfly is one of my favourite animal.

they teach u the lesson of transformation like no other creature.

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Dulce Luna
Knowflake

Posts: 4421
From: The Asylum
Registered: Mar 2006

posted October 05, 2007 03:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dulce Luna     Edit/Delete Message
I live in Rhode Island but no, I haven't seen alot of milkweed in my area. I know they're supposed to be common in North America but I haven't seen them for years.

And I live in one town, go to school in the main city which is 30 minutes away, and work in another town about 20 minutes away.

It would be nice if somebody was breeding them again , but I don't know if that's the case. Because if that was it, I'd be seeing them like crazy in big numbers right? In my case I'm just seeing them at random but very frequently if you can understand what I mean. Almost like they follow me?

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yourfriendinspirit
Knowflake

Posts: 767
From: California, USA
Registered: Oct 2006

posted October 05, 2007 05:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for yourfriendinspirit     Edit/Delete Message
Perhaps they do follow you!
Like an animal guide of sorts?

But I did just find this article:

Monarch butterflies have been as common around Rhode Island beaches and harbors this summer as tourists from Connecticut. And thatís a good thing.
For reasons not fully understood, monarchs were scarce two summers ago. Bad weather and destruction of their winter habitat in Mexico have been cited.
But the monarchs bounced back in a big way last summer and they remain in good numbers this summer.
Those observations stem from results released yesterday of a statewide butterfly survey by volunteers associated with the Audubon Society of Rhode Island.
Read More

Here are a few cool places in Rhode Island that may also be of interest to you:

Newport Butterfly Zoo
409 Bulgarmarsh Road, Tiverton, Rhode Island 02878
Tel: 401-849-9519
URL: www.butterflyzoo.com

Butterfly Farm
679 Great Road
Lincoln, Road Island,02865
401-723-5464
http://www.farmfresh.org/food/farm.php?farm=22


Butterfly Society of Rhode Island
44 Cooke Street
Pawtucket, Rhode Island 02860-6114
401-724-8915

The Rhode Island
Butterfly Release For Weddings
http://www.renaissancebutterflies.com/

I found this there:

Butterfly Indian Legend

If anyone desires a wish to come true they must first
capture a butterfly and whisper that wish to it.

Since a butterfly can make no sound, the butterfly can not reveal
the wish to anyone but the Great Spirit who sees and hears all.

In gratitude for giving the beautiful butterfly its freedom,
the Great Spirit will always grant the wish.

So, according to legend, by making a wish and giving the butterfly its freedom,
the wish will be taken to the heavens to be granted

________
Maybe Dulce the Universe is simply sending you wishes!

------------------
Sendin' love your way,
"your friend in spirit"

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Dulce Luna
Knowflake

Posts: 4421
From: The Asylum
Registered: Mar 2006

posted October 05, 2007 08:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dulce Luna     Edit/Delete Message
quote:
Monarch butterflies have been as common around Rhode Island beaches and harbors this summer as tourists from Connecticut. And thatís a good thing.
For reasons not fully understood, monarchs were scarce two summers ago. Bad weather and destruction of their winter habitat in Mexico have been cited.
But the monarchs bounced back in a big way last summer and they remain in good numbers this summer.
Those observations stem from results released yesterday of a statewide butterfly survey by volunteers associated with the Audubon Society of Rhode Island.

OoOoOoOh, so it is a natural phenomenom and not just my superstitions. Silly me. But that's great that they're back and I'm glad I;m not the only one who notices. It still does seem like they follow me though..hehe.

And great places you listed there, Friend. There all about 30 minutes away from where I live too!

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tuxedo meow
Knowflake

Posts: 716
From: Texas Gulf Coast, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted October 05, 2007 11:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tuxedo meow     Edit/Delete Message
Things are "shifting". Birds and butterflies that usually use and traditionally use one flyway are and have been showing up in different flyway zones. It is good to notice as we need to take heed of nature because we are also nature and while we disguise it with illusion, the changes are very real for us as well.

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BlueTopaz124
Knowflake

Posts: 1251
From: Portland, OR
Registered: Jan 2004

posted October 06, 2007 12:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for BlueTopaz124     Edit/Delete Message
Natural Bridges is a beautiful place...very near the ocean...I'm originally from the SF Bay Area (native of the Peninsula) and have been there a few times...amazing to look up into the trees and see all the Monarchs.

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yourfriendinspirit
Knowflake

Posts: 767
From: California, USA
Registered: Oct 2006

posted October 06, 2007 01:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for yourfriendinspirit     Edit/Delete Message
BlueTopaz124, I'm originally from Santa Cruz myself It is SOoooo beautiful!
In elementry school our classes would do fieldtrips here and the most amazing thing I recall is that the trees were filled with leaves, until you leaned on or touched it!
All of a sudden, hundreds of thousands of monarch butterflies would flutter away having been disturbed. The sounds of all these wings moving at once delighted us. The tree was then left almost completely bare! We thought that that butterflies had been the leaves of the trees! Such a spectacular sight and feeling as a child...

------------------
Sendin' love your way,
"your friend in spirit"

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BlueTopaz124
Knowflake

Posts: 1251
From: Portland, OR
Registered: Jan 2004

posted October 06, 2007 01:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for BlueTopaz124     Edit/Delete Message
It is amazing, isn't it YFIS?...you go and look up in the trees, wondering, "Hmmmm...where are all the butterflies, (expecting to see their trademark colors)" and realize the brownish 'leaves' ARE the butterflies, with their wings closed, resting.
Hundreds of thousands of them up in the trees.

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BlueMeenee
Knowflake

Posts: 36
From: Arizona, USA
Registered: Oct 2007

posted October 06, 2007 05:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for BlueMeenee     Edit/Delete Message
This is very interesting since our backyard has suddenly grown hundreds and hundreds of little brown/blue butterflies about the size of a dime. We let our garden go for July and August because of the heat. I think these little things just took over in all the weeds we just let grow in the garden. It's the same thing in our backyard you described with the monarchs, but miniaturized. My kids have spent hours in the backyard trying to catch them and letting them go.

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