Lindaland
  Lindaland Central
  Pace and the Rest-Step

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq

UBBFriend: Email This Page to Someone! next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Pace and the Rest-Step
proxieme
unregistered
posted April 03, 2006 04:34 PM           Edit/Delete Message
Hey ya'll - I heard this "This I Believe" Essay on NPR today.
It seemed worth sharing :-)

For the audio of this segment, or to read or listen to other essays, go to http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5316322
and http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4538138

The Practice of Slowing Down

by Phil Powers

All Things Considered, April 3, 2006 I believe in the importance of pace. I grew up in a frenetic household, both parents working jobs that demanded their attention 24/7. I was little and fast and rushed around, and I still have that person inside me, always at risk of moving too quickly, missing the connection, making mistakes.

The forest behind our house offered a peaceful respite. My passion for the vertical world took me from tall trees in my backyard to climbing steep cliffs and crags. As a teen, I was moving easily over the landscapes of the American West and was drawn to higher summits. When I was 19, I learned something called the "rest step" from an old mountain climber named Paul Petzoldt. He advised me to rest in the middle of each step completely, but briefly. The rest step, which I still practice today, allows me to walk or climb with little effort. I can move very quickly yet still find a pause in every step.

The awareness of pace I owe to my teacher has served me whether I am seeking the world's highest summits, sharing my love for the mountains with others or kneeling to look my son, Gus, in the eye when he has a question.

It serves me as I drive, adjusting my speed to gain a bit of calm and reach my destination only minutes behind the "record time" a faster lane might provide. It serves me at home where we maintain a tradition of gathering each night at the dinner table to eat and talk to each other.

In times of crisis, pace comes to my aid. Another of Petzoldt's lessons was when faced with an emergency, sit down, collect yourself, make a plan. When needs seem most urgent -- even life-threatening -- the practice of slowing down offers calm and clarity.

In 1987, I was in Pakistan to climb Gasherbrum II, one of the world's highest peaks. We were a small group and it was a very big mountain. Our expedition faced more than its share of difficulty: A long storm wiped out most of our food rations and an avalanche devastated our camp, obliterating our tents. One of our party developed altitude sickness; blood poisoning threatened another. In the face of each disaster, we carefully developed a new plan. Snow caves replaced lost tents. Soups replaced full meals. Eventually we climbed slowly to the top, then made our way safely down.

Concentrating on how I move through the world is important. It's why I reach mountain summits and life goals with energy to spare.

There is magic in any faith. Every once in a while, rushing about, my belief in pace rises up, slows me down and grants me a view of a sunset, a smile from a stranger or a conversation with a child. I owe these moments to what I learned from an old mountain climber and have practiced ever since.
______
Again, the archives are worth checking out, especially the historical archives: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4564213

This one in particular caught my eye: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4670423

IP: Logged

proxieme
unregistered
posted April 03, 2006 11:12 PM           Edit/Delete Message
Bump, darn you!

IP: Logged

Azalaksh
Knowflake

Posts: 6485
From: New Brighton, MN, USA
Registered: Nov 2004

posted April 03, 2006 11:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Azalaksh     Edit/Delete Message
Thanks for posting this gentle reminder, prox
quote:
There is magic in any faith. Every once in a while, rushing about, my belief in pace rises up, slows me down and grants me a view of a sunset, a smile from a stranger or a conversation with a child.
Those sunsets, smiles and conversations are what I want to remember when I'm old -- not whatever it was I was rushing around to accomplish.....

'Z

IP: Logged

All times are Eastern Standard Time

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | Linda-Goodman.com

Copyright 2007

Powered by Infopop www.infopop.com © 2000
Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.46a